Assessment of acid–base derangements among bonnethead (Sphyrna tiburo), bull (Carcharhinus leucas), and lemon (Negaprion brevirostris) sharks from gillnet and longline capture and handling methods

Citation
Hyatt MW, Anderson PA, O’Donnell PM, Berzins IK (2012) Assessment of acid–base derangements among bonnethead (Sphyrna tiburo), bull (Carcharhinus leucas), and lemon (Negaprion brevirostris) sharks from gillnet and longline capture and handling methods. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology 162:113–120. doi: 10.1016/j.cbpa.2011.05.004
Abstract

Blood gasses of wild bonnethead, bull, and lemon sharks were measured with the i-STAT clinical analyzer with the CG4+ cartridge immediately after capture; and again immediately prior to release after tagging, handling and morphometric measurements were taken. Relative reference ranges of post-capture status were established. Among species, stress response to capture was similar for all parameters; however, pH declined and lactate concentrations rose over time, indicating continued insult from capture and/or response to additional handling stress. pCO2 rose faster for S. tiburo than for C. leucas, and lactate concentrations rose faster for S. tiburo than for N. brevirostris. All species caught in gillnets experienced lower pH and higher lactate concentrations than on longlines. Discriminant analysis justified the use of blood gas analysis to assess physiological stress induced by different capture methods. From these results, we recommend: 1) that gear be monitored closely and sharks be removed immediately, or suboptimally, that gear is deployed for the shortest soak time possible; 2) longline over gillnet gear; and 3) extra caution with sensitive species (e.g., S. tiburo), which may include the administration of blood buffers and other therapeutics if a shark is beyond the limits of relative reference ranges reported here.