Analyses of Observer Program Data for the Hawaii-Based Longline Swordfish Fishery for:• Effects of sea turtle regulations on sea turtle interactions, catch rates of retained marketable species and catch rate of sharks;• Economic viability and potential for temporal or spatial closures to

Citation
Kobayashi D, Fisheries UN, Fisheries PI, et al (2006) Analyses of Observer Program Data for the Hawaii-Based Longline Swordfish Fishery for:• Effects of sea turtle regulations on sea turtle interactions, catch rates of retained marketable species and catch rate of sharks;• Economic viability and potential for temporal or spatial closures to. WCPFC, Manila, Philippines
Abstract

Analyses of Observer Program Data for the Hawaii-Based Longline Swordfish Fishery for: Effects of sea turtle regulations on sea turtle interactions, catch rates of retained marketable species and catch rate of sharks; Economic viability and potential for temporal or spatial closures to reduce turtle capture rates; Comparison between 2005 and 2006 turtle catch rates and temporal distribution of effort to explain cause of loggerhead cap being reached in 2006 but not in 2005; and Hook position in a basket of caught turtles and retained fish.

Reducing sea turtle bycatch in pelagic longline fisheries may contribute to the recovery of sea turtle populations. The effectiveness and commercial viability of a turtle avoidance strategy, such as replacing J-shaped hooks with wider circle-shaped hooks, may be fishery-specific, depending on the size and species of turtles and target fish and other differences between fleets. Assessing the effects of turtle avoidance methods in individual fleets is therefore necessary. Regulations based on research conducted in the U.S. North Atlantic longline swordfish fishery came into effect for the Hawaii-based pelagic longline swordfish fishery in May 2004. We conduct the first analysis of the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service observer program database for the Hawaii-based pelagic longline swordfish fishery, in part, to infer possible effects of regulations on turtle interactions, catch rates of retained marketable species and shark capture. There were significant reductions in sea turtle and shark capture rates and reduced proportion of deeply hooked turtles, indicating increased post release survival prospects, without comprising target species catches. Results identify effective and commercially viable turtle avoidance methods that may be suitable for use in other longline fisheries worldwide, potentially resulting in substantial reductions in turtle bycatch in global pelagic longline fisheries.